Workshops » Math for Quilters

Math for Quilters    NEW

Gain confidence as you take control of mathematics: learn to design, plan, layout, cost and price original quilts with ease!

With: Dena Dale Crain
Skill Level: All Levels

Gain confidence as you take control of mathematics: learn to design, plan, layout, cost and price original quilts with ease!

Math for Quilters calendar image

7 Lessons
Type: Scheduled
Price: $70.00
Start Date: 1 Oct 2018

Features

Tags: ​math for quilters, online quilt classes, quilt, patchwork quilt, on-point settings, quilt pattern layouts, cost quilts, price quilts, quilt block analysis, quilt blocks, sashing for quilts, cornerstones for quilts, quilt dimensions, patchwork quilt design

Description

Most patchwork quilters follow published patterns and directions for their patchwork quilting projects. If you are ready to design patchwork quilts, or if you merely want to change the size or proportions of a published project or pattern, this online patchwork quilt class teaches everything you have to know about math to do the job. Learn to use math to plan and scale a patchwork quilt design to fit your needs, not another's preferences.

Green Cheese Communications

Green Cheese Communications

Many patchwork quilters are defeated in their efforts to use math by these problems:

  • Making measurement conversions
  • Fitting square blocks into rectangular quilt plans
  • Planning an on-point setting
  • Maximizing fabric and knowing whether they have enough fabric for a particular task
  • Figuring how much their work might be worth and what price to ask for it

In online patchwork quilt class Math for Quilters, find the easiest ways to overcome all these and all other obstacles as we revisit the math presented in primary and secondary school in a simplified and quilt-specific form.

Learn to plan and design quilts, including how to:

  • Set finished measurements for a quilt.
  • Determine the number and size of blocks, sashing, borders, and bindings to fill those dimensions.
  • Scale and draw blocks to a size appropriate for the design.
  • Make patterns and optional templates.
  • Calculate the amounts of each fabric needed.
  • Examine all the costs of quilting.
  • Set prices for your quilts, and even pick up a few pointers for selling them.

Online patchwork quilt class Math for Quilters is chock full of tables, forms, and samples to be used for many years to come as a basis for recording quilt designs and the strategies for making them. All this and more waits for you in the lessons.

Note: Math for Quilters does not require you to make a quilt; it only shows you how to plan one that might be made.

Student Comments

Cathy:

Math for Quilters – WHAT A CLASS! The lessons were absolutely excellent. I would sign up for any class Dena teaches. This is the type of class that provides both the curious and the serious quilter with an excellent resource package to keep forever!

Linda:

I was a math major in college, and boy did this bring it all back! I have done some quilt design work, and the information included in this class affirmed what I had been doing was correct. I was able to use information on setting blocks on point and determining changes in quilt size, fabric requirements, etc., on a quilt currently in progress - great timing!

Supplies Required for Workshop

To work with and master the math of patchwork and quilting, you need some specialized drawing tools and materials.

Do not waste money on expensive high-tech drawing tools at this time. They can be far too fine for your requirements, especially if you do not know how to use them.

Instead, see what office supply and general stationery stores offer. These tools and supplies are adequate and far less expensive. If later, a particular tool is not of sufficient quality to satisfy your needs, seek a better quality tool then.

Learn to handle the inexpensive variety of tools and get into the good habit of taking care of the tools, and then decide whether you need to upgrade to proper mechanical drafting tools.

Specifically, you need:

  • Inexpensive plain white paper in large sheets (11" x 17" or larger) such as a newsprint tablet or child’s inexpensive sketchpad for drawing designs
  • 1/4" grid (graph) paper for making scale drawings of quilt designs and patchwork blocks (beware online downloads that do not print square or to correct size)
  • Letter size white paper or a notebook with or without lines for taking notes
  • Pencil or pen for note-taking; pencil sharpener for use with wooden pencils
  • Pencil for drawing that can keep a sharp point for a long time. Any hard lead pencil will do, if you keep it very sharp. If you do much pattern drafting, invest in a mechanical pencil with a medium hardness lead of fine diameter, 0.5 – 0.7mm.
  • ArtGum or other eraser that erases cleanly and brushes away easily without smudging, tearing the paper or leaving a residue
  • 12"-18" ruler with a metal edge, more durable and less likely to nick, for drawing straight lines
  • Dressmaker’s tape measure, made from fabric or other non-stretch material, marked in inches on one side and centimeters on the other, with protective metal sheathes on the ends
  • Tool for drawing accurate seam allowances, perhaps a clear plastic ruler with 1/4" grid on it in blue, a plastic 1/4" rod or a brass disk with center hole
  • Paper scissors – no dressmaker shears!
  • Template material – cardboard for single use because the damage easily, or more durable plastic for multiple uses – or manufactured templates in a variety of shapes and sizes
  • One or more tools for working with angles. Make use of a square rotary ruler if it is marked for 30º, 45º, 60º, and 90º angles, or buy plastic drafting triangles. A protractor gives more options for measuring and drawing angles, but it may be difficult to use.
  • Battery or solar powered calculator with basic functions including square root calculation
  • Computer with drawing software and a printer (optional). If you have a graphic design software program that you know how to use, it may be easier to work all calculations and do design planning and sketches on the computer. Acceptable programs include CorelDraw, Adobe Illustrator, EQ or QuiltPro, EazyDraw for Mac and many others. This online patchwork quilt class does not address computer-aided design; please do not expect any technical assistance with software.
  • Compass with extender for drawing circles and arcs (optional). The pointed end goes in the center of the circle, and you draw with a sharpened pencil point on the other leg. Put downward pressure on the handle to secure the needle point. Then swing the compass pencil around the needle point to make a perfect circle or arc for patchwork, appliqué or quilting designs. The extender allows the compass to make larger circles or arcs. Keep the point of the pencil lead sharp with a bit of sandpaper, and keep it positioned in the compass to make the finest possible drawing line.
Compass

Compass used to draw circles

Student Comments

Cathy:

Math for Quilters – WHAT A CLASS! The lessons were absolutely excellent. I would sign up for any class Dena teaches. This is the type of class that provides both the curious and the serious quilter with an excellent resource package to keep forever!

Linda:

I was a math major in college, and boy did this bring it all back! I have done some quilt design work, and the information included in this class affirmed what I had been doing was correct. I was able to use information on setting blocks on point and determining changes in quilt size, fabric requirements, etc., on a quilt currently in progress - great timing!

Georgia:

More detailed than I expected. I learned a few new things but mostly appreciate how the review of "math" topics took the scary out of doing geometry to figure out how my quilts should go together. I may never design my own quilt but I understand how they are developed and how to plan and organize my fabric choices which will help in a lot of ways. The material was so well presented I didn't really have any questions, just read carefully and the information is there.

Maria:

WHAT A CLASS! The lessons were absolutely excellent. The depth is there that is required to understand and/or just review what one has learned in high school and college. This is the type of class that the material provides the "curious"and "serious" quilter with an excellent resource package to keep forever!!!!! The teacher has done all the work in digging through the books to put it all together! I would sign up for any class Dena teaches.